November 1, 2015

A Plea For Any Help From a Friend For Her Cat. Can You Help? + small update.

Kitties, this is a very serious and sad post for us, but mom's and my friend who has no blog just got this terrible news from her kitty's Vet.  You have met him. here.  He is gray with a soft white star on his sweet chest.  Mom helped me post stories about him twice after a trip to see one of my human brothers.  His mom requested that I place the information here for your mom's and dad's to see and offer suggestions and thoughts about what she and her cat might do regarding the diagnosis and her decision making process.  She WILL have the recommended surgery for her cat.  It's his prognosis she wishes input on here if possible.  I will leave the blog up for awhile .  And  she hopes to determine if anyone here has had the same problem with their cat.  It will be a long blog to read, but I know you understand that. The facts here may  possibly help one of you one day as well.  xxoo  Here it is and I cannot make the type larger: So I will "bold it" to help reading it.Here is something from Ossie's mommy for you.This is in the comments below.

I am the mom of the kitty mentioned here. Ossie is still upset over 3 different needle biopsies in 5 days, being shaved twice, rides in the car and is hiding under his blankie. I live in a large city so am fortune to have access to a radiology vet specialty who did kitty's last ultrasound guided biopsy. Can't figure out why the lab reports did not state Ossie had an abscess or a tumor?

I thank all of you for your input. Ossie is my soulmate.
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 The inside of the growth; cannot say if it is an abscess or cancer, is dead tissue. Possibilites are that he swallowed something foreign and it has formed an abscess and the middle of the abscess has become necrotic over time. Since the tissue is necrotic (non-viable) then antibiotics will not help to clear the abscess if that is what it is. The other possibility is that it is a tumor (can be benign or cancer) and that the inner portion of it is necrotic. The only way to know for certain is to surgically explore the area and remove the growth and submit it for further testing (histopathology). This growth is what is causing him to feel sick and it will remove the problem and at the same time give him a certain diagnosis. We can do that surgery here .


Fine needle aspiration of a 4.5 cm mass near the cecum/colon were taken from a 10-year-old male neutered DSH cat with vomiting. Four slides submitted and evaluated.

RE: 2018 MICROSCOPIC DESCRIPTION MICROSCOPIC DESCRIPTION
The samples are moderately cellular and are composed of inflammatory cells mixed with large amounts of necrotic debris and moderate numbers of erythrocytes. Inflammatory cells are composed of a mixture of neutrophils and macrophages. Macrophages often contain cellular debris and occasionally exhibit leukophagocytosis. Additionally, low numbers
of epithelial cell clusters are found. The cells are round to
occasionally columnar with moderate amounts of moderately basophilic cytoplasm and distinct cell margins. Occasionally the cells are vacuolated. The nuclei are round, eccentric and occasionally appear basilar, 2.5 to 3 times the diameter of an erythrocyte and have moderately to coarsely stippled chromatin and contain 1 to 2 prominent round nucleoli that vary in size. Definitive organisms are not seen.


and lastly:


Marked necrosis occurs both within the necrotic center of an abscess as well as the necrotic center of a neoplasm. Unfortunately, both differentials remain possible in this case. This could represent the necrotic and inflamed center within an abscess with aspiration of the surrounding reactive epithelial tissue. Unfortunately, aspiration of
the necrotic and inflamed center within a neoplasm also is a potential differential. In these cases, biopsy with histopathologic evaluation
is highly recommended to determine the precise cause. It can also help more accurately assess malignant potential. Consultation with an internal medicine specialist regarding additional diagnostics as well
as treatment options may be of benefit in this case. Consultation with an internal medicine specialist can be obtained.

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Thank you kitties and woofies.  

31 comments:

  1. I have never has anything like that with any of my cats. Glad she is doing the surgery and then she can decide what to do. It doesn't sound good but on the other hand it doesn't sound too bad if it is an abscess. When are they going to do the surgery and how sick is the cat???

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  2. I am so sorry. Our little Mistycat had a mass at the base of her esophagus where it joined her stomach. The vet felt that even after surgery she might not be able to eat and she was losing weight because she could not keep anything down. We did not want to put her through a needless surgery (that might not help) so we made the sad, awful decision to put her down (as the vet said she probably felt "sick" all of the time).

    I don't envy you the decisions you have to make. The not-knowing is so hard and knowing what to do (for the kitty) is even harder. Blessings as you figure it all out. xo Diana

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  3. I have never heard of anything like this, but I agree she should do the surgery. I will be praying for him. If it is cancer, I have heard that cats tolerate chemo better than humans. Tanner's Mom of Four white cats would know a lot about that. XO

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  4. We say so long as he is healthy, move forward and see what they find. We've never heard of something like that but we are sending them all purrs and hope for some answers.

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  5. I am glad the surgery will happen, it sounds like the only way to know. I would have thought that if it was serious cancer that the diagnostic procedures would have detected it by now. Yes, cats do tolerate chemo okay and Tanner is a fine example of that.

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  6. It sounds as though the kitty is getting the best care. I agree the surgery sounds the best way to proceed, but have never heard of this before. Sending lots of gentle purrs and prayers for the kitty and his mommy xoxox

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  7. I don't really know enough about such things to say any more than that I agree with the others that the surgery should probably be done. Big hugs from us and purrs from the kitties!

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  8. This brings back some memories of Sweet Praline. She had the mass in her digestive system, which the vet suspected was cancerous. However, at Praline's advanced age, the vet thought even the biopsy could be deadly. The vet recommended we make her as comfortable as possible and said she probably only had 6 months. Praline only had 1 month. However, if the vet is recommending surgery for this kitty and believes it will help, then I would definitely do it. Sending special thoughts and purrs.

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  9. We are adding our purrayers to the rest. We hope this has a good outcome.

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  10. Healing purrs for the poor cat. Sounds as if they will know more after the surgery. Paws crossed it is benign and once the growth is removed the cat will be OK.

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  11. Katie your friend has a thorough diagnosis and a plan. If kitty is healthy then she has nothing to lose by having surgery. Please update here after the surgery

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  12. It's good that they are doing the surgery. I am so sorry for your friend and hope this works out well for the kitty. It does sound, as Savannah said above, that there is a thorough diagnosis and plan.

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  13. We don't have advice, but we'll purr and purray for him and hope the surgery goes well and he gets a good report. XOXOXO

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  14. We also send big purrs.
    Sadly, we have no insights to offer.
    Purrs Georgia and Julie,
    Treasure and JJ

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  15. Katie, Mommy says she has not had any experience with something like this ever, but she does feel the pathologists have done a very detailed study of the biopsy tissue.

    Maybe Mom is too hopeful, but she would think that if it was a cancerous mass that that would be more clear, and the fact that it has these odd necrotic cells without seeing cancer cells gives more hope.

    Has the cat's Mom asked what the likelihood is that the kitty will recover without having digestive problems if it IS an abscess? If the vet has to remove part of its colon, that might change things going foreward.

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  16. Well weez sendin' lots of purrayers. Like sum udders we awe curious bout da purrognosis goin' furward after da surgery. We can't say any more than da VET 'bout what it is, what caused it, or what tweatment plan shuld be used wiffout furst knowin' fur sure what it is. We hope all goes well wiff da surgery and removal.

    Luv ya'

    Dezi and Lexi

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  17. I feel bad for this kitty and his human and what they are having to deal with. My human has never had this type of situation (although she's been through a lot of other things with cats in the past), so all I can do is send purrs and hope that whatever this growth is, that once it's removed, that's it and it's not cancer.

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  18. I am so sorry to hear this. Although I can't think of any suggestions, it sounds surgery is the best course to go. Your friend must be very worried...I hope it will go well, and hope it's something treatable.

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  19. I am the mom of the kitty mentioned here. Ossie is still upset over 3 different needle biopsies in 5 days, being shaved twice, rides in the car and is hiding under his blankie. I live in a large city so am fortune to have access to a radiology vet specialty who did kitty's last ultrasound guided biopsy. Can't figure out why the lab reports did not state Ossie had an abscess or a tumor?

    I thank all of you for your input. Ossie is my soulmate.

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  20. We will put Ossie in our purrayers, and cross all our paws for a successful surgery and outcome. Mommy was terrified when The Baby had exploratory surgery two summers ago (at 15) but getting a firm diagnosis made the world of difference for her treatment and today she's as feisty as ever.

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  21. I agree with what others have said about going forward with the surgery. As long as Ossie is healthy, the only way you will know what you are dealing with is to have the surgery. Having that information will help you decide on how to proceed. We send lots of purrs and good thoughts for Ossie. ~Island Cat Mom

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  22. We wish we had some insight or advice to give, but this is something with which we have no experience. The fact that the docs have a plan, and that the surgery will lead to a prognosis is good. We are glad that Ossie will have the surgery. Purrs, prayers and hugs during this very difficult time.

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  23. Sounds like surgery is the best option. It all sounds quite technical, and we think the only way to even figure out a prognosis is to get this thing out. We are sending lots of purrs and prayers to Ossie. XOCK, Lily Olivia, Mauricio, Misty May, Giulietta, Fiona, Astrid, Lisbeth and Calista Jo

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  24. I thinking of what happining it was bad awful very hard to put her down even harder for Cats.Good for her treatmants and today she's as faisty as ever.
    Have a good night Sis!
    xxooxx
    Sis,Katie,miyuki and Victoria,
    Michiko

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  25. Sending hugs.

    Luv, Angel Keisha and Murphy the Poodle

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  26. Sorry to say we have no knowledge of this type of problem but it sounds like once the mass is removed, they can do a better job of a definitive diagnosis - cancer or not cancer. Then you will be in a better position to know what's next. We wish you lots of luck and are sending POTP!

    Hugs, Sammy

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  27. Mom knows nothing about kitties. But after reading the story, we think saying prayers and waiting for the surgery to happen is the best idea. Also, we will think happy thoughts for Ossie to be fine after that naughty thing is out of there.

    Love and extra healing licks,
    Cupcake

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  28. We think it's best for the vets to do the surgery so you have a clear diagnosis. They can discuss everything with you and let you decide what you think is best for Ossie.
    Luv Hannah and Lucy xx xx

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  29. We know Ossie's poor Mama must be fretting and fretting. But Ossie loves her and will be comforted by being cared for by someone he loves sooooo much. We are purring for them both as they take the next steps. You are a good girl to help your friend Katie. XOXOXOXO

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  30. I wish I had some knowledge or advise but can only say a prayer for Ossie and his Mom.
    xxoo
    Maggie

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Leave your meows, barks and snorgles and we'll appreciate every one. XXOO